Impact

At the Anne Frank Trust UK we have an outstanding track record of independent evaluation of our activities. The present research both confirms and enlarges the evidence that our education programmes have a powerful impact on prejudice and discrimination.

Building Commonality springs from a long-standing partnership between the Trust and social psychologists at the University of Kent. It is the second annual report produced by Katie Goodbun as part of her 3-year PhD at Kent, supervised by Professor Dominic Abrams and funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Findings include that 87.6% of young people (aged 11-16) achieved significant progress in their:

  • knowledge about prejudice
  • attitudes towards stereotypes
  • confidence to report prejudice-related bullying
  • feelings of empathy towards others

The report also reveals that 77.1% of young people show more positive attitudes and 76.1% have increased feelings of commonality to those different from themselves. Of those young people who started out with little or no understanding of extremism, 94.6% recognised that prejudice is dangerous and can cause extremism.

Tim Robertson, Chief Executive of the Anne Frank Trust UK said: “This research both confirms and enlarges the evidence that our education programmes have a powerful impact on prejudice and discrimination. Overall, it provides an articulate message that our approach works and that there is a path to a future free from prejudice. It’s very heartening.”

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